10 Better Ways to Say "I Look Forward to the Meeting" (2023)

Have you ever wondered how to say “I look forward to the meeting” in different ways? This article will explore some good email alternatives you can use when accepting an invite to a business (or personal) meeting. We’ll share the best synonyms to include in your emails.

Other ways to say “I look forward to the meeting” are “I look forward to meeting you,” “I look forward to hearing what you have to say,” and “I’m intrigued to learn more.” These are great synonyms for showing eagerness to meet someone or learn from them during a meeting.

10 Better Ways to Say "I Look Forward to the Meeting" (1)

1. I Look Forward to Meeting You

“I look forward to meeting you” is a simple alternative that shows your enthusiasm without being too over the top. It’s great for professional emails when you don’t want to seem too excited about the meeting coming up.

“Meeting you” and “the meeting” are both common phrases to use after “I look forward to.” “Meeting you” is slightly more personal than “the meeting,” which is why “I look forward to meeting you” can work better in most emails.

  • Dear Michael,
  • I look forward to meeting you. I think it’ll be a good time for us to learn some things about each other.
  • All the best,
  • Storm
  • Dear Albert
  • I look forward to meeting you. I hope we’ll be able to learn some things from each other.
  • Kind regards,
  • Chrissy

Watch the video: Only 1 percent of our visitors get these 3 grammar questions right...

2. I Look Forward to Hearing What You Have to Say

This phrase is great when you know that someone has a lot to tell you during a meeting. It gives them a chance to think through their talking points before coming at you with them.

This usually encourages people to have a plan before the meeting. A plan is always going to help a meeting go much smoother, as long as someone sticks to it.

  • Dear Fred,
  • I look forward to hearing what you have to say. I’m keen to learn whether you agree on some points.
  • All the best,
  • Max
  • Dear Lucas,
  • I look forward to hearing what you have to say. I think it’ll be good for both of us.
  • Kind regards,
  • Kristen

3. I’m Intrigued to Learn More

“I’m intrigued to learn more” shows that someone has captured your interest. It’s a great way of showing that you want to meet with them to learn what they might have to say about something.

(Video) 10 better ways to say - I am happy! Stop speaking basic English #shorts by Nysha

You should use it when you respect the recipient and want to find out more about whatever they are talking about. For example, you might use it when emailing your boss to show that you’re keen to find out more about some new workplace rules.

  • Dear Lewis,
  • I’m intrigued to learn more. I’d love to set up a meeting with you to find out how you did this.
  • All the best,
  • Sue
  • Dear Martin,
  • I’m intrigued to learn more. That’s why I’m looking forward to the meeting you have planned.
  • Kind regards,
  • Joe

4. I Eagerly Anticipate Meeting With You

This phrase is great to show your excitement before meeting someone. It lets them know that you “eagerly anticipate” the meeting, which is a formal way of showing that you’re happy to meet them and talk through some ideas with them.

  • Dear Isaiah,
  • I eagerly anticipate meeting with you. I think I’ll share some things that’ll surprise you.
  • All the best,
  • Steven
  • Dear Dustin,
  • I eagerly anticipate meeting with you. I’m sure there will be some questions answered by the end.
  • Kind regards,
  • Robyn

5. I Am Looking Forward to It

“I am looking forward to it” is a simple alternative, but it works well in many contexts. “Looking forward” is used here to show that you are constantly looking toward the meeting date. It shows more excitement than a simple “I look forward to it.”

This one works well because it shows a consistent excitement or eagerness for a meeting. If you’re meeting with a superior or someone you respect, this phrase is going to help you show how much you admire them.

  • Dear Jackie,
  • I am looking forward to it. I can’t think of a better place to host the meeting.
  • All the best,
  • Adrian
  • Dear Alex,
  • I am looking forward to it. Let me know if there’s anything I need to bring before we get going.
  • Kind regards,
  • Sarah

6. I’ll Keep It in My Diary

“I’ll keep it in my diary” shows that you’re excited about a meeting and have jotted the specific time or date down in your calendar. It’s a great choice when showing how keen you are.

The idea is that you’re so keen you’ve written down the date to remember it. While this is common in formal and business contexts, it still shows the recipient that you’re very much looking forward to the meeting with them.

  • Dear Laura,
  • I’ll keep it in my diary. It’s been a while since I’ve had a proper meeting with someone.
  • All the best,
  • Nicola
  • Dear Nate,
  • I’ll keep it in my diary. I’m sure it’ll be a very good experience for both of us.
  • Kind regards,
  • Tim

7. I Anticipate This Meeting to Be a Success

You should use this phrase to come across as confident and professional in the same breath. It shows that you “anticipate” something to be successful, especially if you think you have a lot of positive things to offer in the meeting.

(Video) 10 BETTER Ways to Say YOU in English | Advanced English Lesson | Aussie English

Imagine you’re having a meeting with a superior to discuss project plans. If you believe you have strong ideas that’ll help a project move forward, you might believe the meeting will be a “success.”

That’s why this phrase works. It shows confidence and professionalism with a simple delivery in your email.

  • Dear Paul,
  • I anticipate this meeting to be a success. I think you’ll like what I have to say about the new changes.
  • All the best,
  • Christopher
  • Dear Eddie,
  • I anticipate this meeting to be a success. I’m very confident that things will work out for us.
  • Kind regards,
  • George

8. I Look Forward to Picking Your Brain

“I look forward to picking your brain” is a slightly more informal phrase, but it works well in most professional emails. “Picking your brain” is an idiomatic expression showing that you’d like to ask someone questions and see how they think.

It’s a good choice if you respect the recipient’s knowledge or experience. It shows that you’d like to learn from them and will let them control the narrative of the meeting when you get there.

  • Dear Joshua,
  • I look forward to picking your brain a bit more about this. The meeting is the perfect place to do that.
  • All the best,
  • Craig
  • Dear Allison,
  • I look forward to picking your brain. I would like a chance to get to know the job roles around here.
  • Kind regards,
  • Marcus

9. I’m Keen to Learn, so Any Time Works for Me

“I’m keen to learn” is a great introduction to an email to show that you’re willing to let someone teach you. Any time works for me” shows that you’re so keen for the meeting to take place you don’t mind when they decide to do it.

Be careful with this, though. If you’re not flexible with your schedule, you might find they set a meeting time that doesn’t work for you. This could cause more logistical problems than you might have set out to create.

  • Dear Phillipa,
  • I’m keen to learn, so any time works for me. Just pick a time that is going to give you the most freedom.
  • All the best,
  • Dean
  • Dear Andrew,
  • I’m keen to learn, so any time works for me. I’ll be happy to come along as long as you can teach me some things.
  • Kind regards,
  • Isaac

10. Let’s Get This Meeting Sorted Out

This phrase is a great way to set up a meeting with someone, especially if a final date or time hasn’t been set. It shows that you’re keen for the meeting to go ahead, but you need to confirm a few things before that happens.

(Video) 10 Better Ways To Say - I ❤️ it! - Improve Your English Fluency With Advanced Phrases #shorts Ananya

This phrase could work well if the recipient is prone to waiting before setting official meeting plans. It should encourage them to sort the meeting out quickly because you want it to occur sooner.

  • Dear Cameron,
  • Let’s get this meeting sorted out. That’ll give me something to look forward to over the next few weeks.
  • All the best,
  • Sue
  • Dear Martha,
  • Let’s get this meeting sorted out, shall we? I’d love to learn more from you if I’m given a chance.
  • Kind regards,
  • Craig

Is It Correct to Say “I Look Forward to the Meeting”

“I look forward to the meeting” is correct to include in formal emails. It shows that you “look forward” to a future date or time when a meeting is set.

You might also see “I am looking forward to the meeting.” This is a very similar phrase, but the tense changes.

“I am looking” implies that you are actively thinking about the meeting every day until it takes place. “I look” means you are only thinking about the day when the meeting occurs (rather than the build-up to it).

Related posts:

  1. 12 Better Ways to Say “I Look Forward to Working With You”
  2. 12 Better Ways to Say “I Look Forward to Meeting You”
  3. 12 Best Replies To “Nice Meeting You” On Email (Business Context)
  4. 10 Better Ways to Say “I Look Forward to Hearing From You”

FAQs

What's another way to say I look forward to meeting you? ›

I look forward to seeing you soon. or I'm looking forward to seeing you soon. I look forward to meet you or look forward to meeting you?

How do you say looking forward to a meeting? ›

Formal: I look forward to meeting you at the conference. Informal: I'm looking forward to meeting you at the conference.

What can I say instead of I look forward to? ›

7 alternatives to “I look forward to hearing from you”
  • 1 Use a call-to-action. ...
  • 2 I'm eager to receive your feedback. ...
  • 3 I appreciate your quick response. ...
  • 4 Always happy to hear from you. ...
  • 5 Keep me informed . . . ...
  • 6 I await your immediate response. ...
  • 7 Write soon!
3 Sept 2021

How do you say I look forward to meeting everyone? ›

Looking forward to meeting you all.
  1. - Michael, we're so looking forward to meeting you.
  2. I've been looking forward to meeting you.
  3. I was looking forward to meeting you.
  4. I've been looking forward to meeting you.
  5. Looking forward to meeting the trailblazers.
  6. He was really looking forward to meeting you.

Can we say looking forward to meeting you? ›

Yes, your sentence is correct! If you haven't met the person before, you can use this sentence for an online meeting. However, if you have met this person, you can change your sentence to: I look forward to meeting with you soon.

Is it correct to say looking forward to our meeting? ›

These are both correct. I would add, though, that I'm looking forward to our meeting sounds (to me, at least) more conversational (and a bit more genuine), whereas I look forward to our meeting is a bit more formal/polite.

How do you say I look forward to meet you in email? ›

I look forward to hearing from you soon / meeting you next Tuesday. I look forward to seeing you soon. I'm looking forward to your reply.

How do you professionally say I look forward to working with you? ›

01“I'm happy to be a part of this team, and I eagerly anticipate your insights and input to help get me up to speed.” This formal response to being put into a team for the first time is good to use when you're working with older or more experienced colleagues. It shows respect.

How do you say looking forward to attend? ›

Sounds like a Normal sentence. But this sentence is actually incorrect. The correct sentence would be, " I look forward to meeting you “.

How do you say I'm excited professionally? ›

Here are 5 (but by no means all) alternatives to the word “excited” when announcing something:
  1. Thrilled – why not? ...
  2. Delighted – I'm biased here, but this word makes me happy!
  3. Elated – sounds like you're on Cloud 9 and if your news can match it, we'll have no worries in thinking “good for you”!
3 Feb 2013

How do you say look into it professionally? ›

Synonyms of look (into)
  1. explore.
  2. investigate.
  3. inquire (into)
  4. check into.
  5. delve (into)
  6. research.
  7. dig (into)
  8. examine.

How do you use looking forward in a sentence? ›

Look forward to
  1. I'm looking forward to the holidays.
  2. We're looking forward to going to Switzerland next month.
  3. We're looking forward to him arriving next week.
  4. I look forward to your reply.
  5. I look forward to hearing from you soon.
  6. We look forward to receiving payment for the services detailed above.
3 days ago

How do you say as soon as you can professionally? ›

At your earliest convenience.

How do you professionally say it's up to you? ›

And a more formal and polite way is: Whatever you prefer.

How do you say professionally by the way? ›

Incidentally matches the meaning most closely to "By the way" while largely shedding the (in my opinion unfair) casual reputation of "By the Way".
...
However, if you wish to use a variant which is more formal, then you could use a substitute such as:
  1. Speaking of which,
  2. This brings to mind.
  3. Apropos.
12 Jul 2011

How do you say we hope you can attend? ›

Hope to see you in May!/Your presence at the meeting will be very useful. Please let me know if you will be able to attend/can make it, asap/as soon as possible. Thanks a lot for the invitation/Thank you for your kind invitation. I would be delighted to attend/I'd love to come to the meeting.

How do you say cool professionally? ›

41 Alternatives to the Word 'Cool'
  1. Astonishing.
  2. Bewitching.
  3. Brilliant.
  4. Captivating.
  5. Charming.
  6. Copacetic.
  7. Delightful.
  8. Dashing.
20 Mar 2015

How do you say right now professionally? ›

synonyms for right now
  1. directly.
  2. presently.
  3. at present.
  4. forthwith.
  5. pronto.
  6. right away.
  7. straightaway.

How do you say professionally good at something? ›

be clever / great / adept at

How do you say professionally so? ›

adverb
  1. therefore.
  2. thus.
  3. consequently.
  4. hence.
  5. accordingly.
  6. in consequence.
  7. wherefore.
  8. thereupon.

Is looking forward to it formal? ›

'I look forward to' is more formal, and typically the way you'd sign off in a business correspondence. It implies that you're expecting the next action to come from the recipient of your letter or email.

How do you say looking forward to working with you professionally? ›

I'm excited to meet the team on Friday, and I look forward to working with everyone to reach all project targets. Kindly inform me if you have any questions about the transition process or how I may assist you before I resume work.

Is it professional to say I look forward to seeing? ›

That is grammatically perfectly correct. It is a commonly used formal phrase. You wouldn't be quite so formal in casual conversation. You might just say, 'look forward to seeing you.

How do you say in the future professionally? ›

henceforth
  1. from this point forward.
  2. from this time forth.
  3. hence.
  4. hereafter.
  5. in the future.

How do you say good looking professionally? ›

beautiful
  1. admirable.
  2. alluring.
  3. angelic.
  4. appealing.
  5. beauteous.
  6. bewitching.
  7. charming.
  8. classy.

How do you say look professionally? ›

enquire
  1. analyze.
  2. check.
  3. examine.
  4. explore.
  5. go over.
  6. inquire.
  7. inspect.
  8. investigate.

How do you say we are looking forward to do business with you? ›

Referring to future business
  1. We look forward to a successful working relationship in the future.
  2. We would be (very) pleased to do business with your company.
  3. I would be happy to have an opportunity to work with your firm.

How do you say see you later professionally? ›

I look forward to our next meeting

This very formal expression is appropriate if you would like to continue doing business with someone. It lets the person know that although you're saying goodbye now, you want to keep in contact with him or her.

Videos

1. 10 DIFFERENT WAYS TO SAY 'I LIKE' *advanced vocabulary*
(English with LinguaTrip!)
2. Train - 50 Ways To Say Goodbye (Lyrics) "Help me, help me I'm no good at goodbyes" [tiktok] | 3starz
(3starz)
3. 10 Ways To Say Good-Bye | English Speaking Practice | Mark Kulek - ESL
(Mark Kulek)
4. Train - 50 Ways to Say Goodbye (Video)
(Train)
5. 10 Ways To Say Good-Bye | Easy English Conversation Practice | Mark Kulek - ESL
(Mark Kulek)
6. 10 Different ways to say I'M BUSY in English | Advanced English Vocabulary 🚀
(Learn English with Harry)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Merrill Bechtelar CPA

Last Updated: 02/28/2023

Views: 5313

Rating: 5 / 5 (50 voted)

Reviews: 89% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Merrill Bechtelar CPA

Birthday: 1996-05-19

Address: Apt. 114 873 White Lodge, Libbyfurt, CA 93006

Phone: +5983010455207

Job: Legacy Representative

Hobby: Blacksmithing, Urban exploration, Sudoku, Slacklining, Creative writing, Community, Letterboxing

Introduction: My name is Merrill Bechtelar CPA, I am a clean, agreeable, glorious, magnificent, witty, enchanting, comfortable person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.